Developing data use capacity in the maternal, newborn, child health and nutrition sector in Malawi, Mali, Mozambique and Tanzania: an evolving strategy

This post was originally published as a commentary in the Journal of Global Health here. Alongside the Sustainable Development Goals is a call for a “data revolution” that will “monitor progress, hold governments accountable, and foster sustainable development”. With recent technological advances, the amount and types of data available to...

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Action not acronyms!: Prioritise integrated, contextually appropriate quality improvement tools with the health workers in focus

In much of Sub Saharan Africa, maternal and newborn care is provided by frontline staff in rural health facilities, characterized by a lack of resources and limited senior support. A plethora of well-intended Quality Improvement (QI) projects, often overlapping in scope but with distinct methodologies, may overwhelm and confuse rather...

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Safer Births Project – Haydom, Tanzania

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgfkXEetyJw A film about the Safer Births Project implemented at Haydom Lutheran Hospital in Tanzania from 2013-2018. The project brought new research and tools to help improve newborn care through innovative training solutions and therapy products. Learn more: www.saferbirths.com Original post 

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How can we improve the care of small and sick newborns in low- and middle-income countries?: A summary of a global discussion on CHIFA: Part 2

A recent study on the measurement of service readiness for providing inpatient care of small and sick newborns puts the spotlight on improving monitoring systems, quality of care and investments in health systems scale-up to end preventable newborn death and disability, as discussed in Part 2 in a series of...

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Tackling Tanzania’s Premature Infant Mortality

The following typical anecdote served as the urgent impetus to develop a strategy to reduce premature infant mortality in Tanzania, a low resource country. Rounding in a newborn intensive care area where babies are not routinely monitored (see Picture 1), the care team came upon a 30 week premature infant...

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