A Big Global Movement for the World’s Smallest Newborns

Delegates from 10 countries will gather in Blantyre, Malawi, October 24–26 to discuss how to accelerate the adoption of life-saving care for premature babies, especially increasing the adoption of kangaroo mother care, nutrition, and thermal care interventions. The Government of Malawi and other partners are hosting the fourth meeting of the Kangaroo Mother Care Acceleration Partnership (KAP). Participants will come from six “priority countries” chosen because of their high rates of premature birth and strong political will to take action. For the past three years, newborn health experts from these countries have been sharing research, program experience, and innovations and built a professional network through meetings, site visits, and an online platform. Delegates from four additional countries whose kangaroo mother care acceleration plans have recently gained momentum, are also attending.

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A Partnership to Champion Healthy Newborns in Nigeria

My first contact with Save the Children was in 2008, just after I obtained my fellowship in pediatrics from the National Post-Graduate Medical College of Nigeria. I was in Katsina – and one of only two pediatricians in that city – when Save the Children invited me for training on...

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Activist breaks MNH barrier in Lagos

During the past 30 years, Monsurat Folake Ahmed-Ogundipe has worked as a Community Health Extension Worker, a nurse, and a midwife, before finally bagging a BSc in Nursing Education. Currently she works as a health education officer in Alimosho Local Government Area of Lagos State. As a health care educator,...

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Affordable respiratory support for newborns

Although many premature newborns in high-income countries receive respiratory support in the form of bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) therapy, the majority of newborns in low-resource settings do not have access to such therapy. Over the past six years, Hadleigh Health Technologies LLC has designed, developed, and is now...

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